Port Richmond Iron Works, I. P. Morris & Co.

Allgemeines

FirmennamePort Richmond Iron Works, I. P. Morris & Co.
OrtssitzPhiladelphia (Penns.)
Stra├čeRichmond Street
Art des UnternehmensMaschinenfabrik, Eisengie├čerei und Kesselschmiede
Anmerkungen1868: "Port Richmond Iron Works" mit I. P. Morris, Towne & Co., Eigent├╝mer. Bis 1846 Market und Schuylkill Seventh streets, dann am Delaware River (Richmond street, oder Point Road), Richmond Street, York Street, Beach Street und Ball Street (S├╝dwest-Ecke). Vergl. auch: "J. P. Morris & Co." (ohne Zusatz). Anzahl und Leistung der Dampfmaschinen in allen Hexamer-Dokumentationen unbekannt. Eigent├╝mer 1875/92: "I. P. Morris & Co.", bzw. 1892 "By a Corporation" mit der Leitung durch: Charles Cramp, Pr├Ąsident; Henry W. Cramp, Finanzleiter; William P. Thomas, Sekret├Ąr. Produkte 1875/82/94: Allgemeiner Maschinenbau, Kessel, Dampfmaschinen usw. Keine detaillierten Angaben zur Dampfkraft.
Quellenangaben[Wiley: American iron trade manual (1874) 147] [Bishop: History of American manufacturers 3 (1868) 24] [Freedley: Philadelphia and its manufactures (1857) 326+432]




Unternehmensgeschichte

Zeit Ereignis
1803 Geburt von Isaac P. Morris, einer der Originalpartner von "Levi Morris & Co."
1820 Es wird Anthrazitkohle f├╝r das Schmelzen des Eisens eingesetzt.
1828 Gr├╝ndung unter der Firma "Levi Morris & Co." an der Ecke Market und Schuylkill Seventh Streets
1834 Mr. Taws ist seither mit der Firma verbunden. - Er machte seine Lehre bei "Rush & Muhlenberg", den Vorg├Ąngern von Oliver Evans.
1838 Eine Hobelmaschine wird erworben und in den Richmond Works aufgestellt.
1845 Erbaut (mit Erweiterungen bis 1894)
1846 Die Werke werden von der Market und Schuylkill Seventh Streets zum Delaware River verlegt.
1861 Mr. Towne tritt in die Firma ein.




Produkte

Produkt ab Bem. bis Bem. Kommentar
allgemeiner Maschinenbau 1874 [Wiley: American iron trade (1874)] 1895 [Hexamer]  
Dampfmaschinen 1866 [Hexamer] 1895 [Hexamer]  
Gu├čeisen 1874 [Wiley: American iron trade (1874)] 1874 [Wiley: American iron trade (1874)] Vorgabe: Iron foundry
Kessel 1866 [Hexamer] 1895 [Hexamer]  
Schiffsdampfmaschinen   f├╝r "Mississippi" (Eriesee) vor 1857      
Wasserturbinen 1895 in der Adams Station, Niagaraf├Ąlle 1895 in der Adams Station, Niagaraf├Ąlle gefertigt nach Zeichnungen von "Piccard, Pictet & Co.", Genf




Betriebene Dampfmaschinen

Bezeichnung Bauzeit Hersteller
Dampfmaschine um 1868 unbekannt




Maschinelle Ausstattung

Zeit Objekt Anz. Betriebsteil Hersteller Kennwert Wert [...] Beschreibung Verwendung
1875 Dampfkessel 8   unbekannt          




Personal

Zeit gesamt Arbeiter Angest. Lehrl. Kommentar
1875 150        
1892 450       450 - 500 Arbeiter
1894 400        
1895 400        




Allgemeines

ZEIT1868
THEMAFirmenbeschreibung
TEXTThis is one of the establishments to which Philadelphia is indebted for her reputation for ability to construct heavy machinery. Its existence may be said to cover the whole period of the manufacture of machinery by modern methods. In 1828, when Levi Morris & Co., the predecessors of the present firm, commenced business, many of the tools which are now deemed indispensable in every machine shop, even those of the most moderate pretensions, were scarcely known. At that time slide lathes and power drill presses were not in general use, and the only representative of the planing-machine in this country, it is believed, was to be found at the Allaire Works, in New York, originally built for fluting rollers. It was not until 1838 that a planer was purchased and fitted up in the Richmond works. In the Foundry department, the operations were also conducted with very imperfect and inefficient machinery compared With that now in use. Anthracite coal, which was introduced here about 1820, was by no means exclusively used for melting iron. The blowing machinery was of a very primitive character, with unwieldy wooden bellows and open tuyeres. The best product was not more than two thousand to three thousand pounds of iron in an hour, and in the course of the heat an average much below this. With the present improved blowing machinery, and improved furnaces, eight tons have been melted in forty-six minutes, with a consumption of coal of one pound to eight pounds of iron melted. In 1846, the works were removed from Market and Schuylkill Seventh streets to their present location, which is on the Delaware River, adjoining the Reading Railroad Coal Wharves on the south. The buildings, which are of brick, occupy a lot having a front on the Delaware River of 145 feet, a front on Richmond street, or Point Road, of 260 feet, and an entire depth or length, from the Richmond side to the end of wharf, of 1.050 feet. The remarkable feature in this establishment is the extraordinary size of the tools in use, and the perfection of the machines employed in the various shops. In the Foundry there are three Cupola Furnaces, the largest of which will melt twelve tons of iron per hour. In the Machine Shop, there is a Planing Machine capable of planing castings eight feet wide, six feet high, and thirty-two feet long; a Lathe that will swing six feet clear, and turn a length of thirty-four feet; and a Boring Mill, possessing also the qualities of a horizontal lathe, which will bore out a cylinder sixteen feet in diameter and eighteen feet long. This is believed to be the largest in America or Europe. In their Boiler Shop they have one large Riveting Machine, and facilities for making boilers or plate-iron work, of every description that may be desired. But a few years ago, Steam Boilers, made of plate-iron, were riveted exclusively with hand-hammers; and when the City Water-Works were located at Centre Square, the steam boilers were built of wood, with cast-iron furnaces. At the present time, in this, as in the best ehops, circular boilers are riveted in a machine, by pressure produced by a cam operating upon a sliding mandril. In their Smithery, they have a Nasmyth Steam Hammer for heavy forgings; a Tilt Hammer for light work; and throughout the establishment, the minor tools, consisting of Lathes, Boring Mills, Slotting and Shaping Machines, Planing Machines, Horizontal and Vertical Drills, etc., etc., are all of the best description, and combine the latest improvements. The monuments of this firm's engineering ability are found in all parts of the country. Probably the largest engines for producing iron with anthracite coal ever built in this country, are the product of their works. For the %%Lackawanna Iron Works, at Scranton, Pa., they built two Blowing Cylinders, nine feet bore, and ten feet stroke, and Steam Cylinders fifty-four inches in diameter and ten feet stroke. For %%Seyfert McManus & Go's, furnace, at Reading, they built a direct high pressure Blowing Machine, the steam cylinder being forty inches in diameter, and blowing cylinder one hundred and two inches, both seven feet stroke of piston. For the %%Lehigh Crane Co., they built a Beam Condensing Engine, having a steam cylinder fifty-eight inches diameter, and a blowing cylinder ninety-three inches, both ten feet stroke of piston. The beam of this engine works on a column of cast-iron thirty feet high, and the whole is set upon a heavy cast-iron bed plate. For the %%Thomas Iron Works, they supplied two very large beam engines, the steam cylinders being sixty-six inches in diameter, and the blowing cylinders one hundred and eight inches diameter, and ten feet stroke. These, it is believed, are the heaviest ever made for the purpose. The large engines of the United States Mint, and the lever beam Cornish Pumping Engine at the %%Schuylkill Water Works, sixty inches diameter, ten feet stroke, were constructed at their works. This firm also built; the Iron Light House for the ship shoal, in the Gulf of Mexico, which was put up on screw piles, in water fifteen feet d.eep, and at a distance of twelve miles from land. The whole height of the structure, from the water to the top of the spire, was one hundred and twenty-two feet, and from the water to the focal plane, one hundred and seven and a half feet. The structure above the foundation to the deck, a height of ninety-three feet, was erected in their yard, complete in all its parts before shipping 87 For Louisiana and the West Indies, they have manufactured every variety of sugar apparatus and engines for sugar-mills; and North Carolina they have supplied with a large number of their celebrated Gang Saw Mills, by which a log of yellow pine can be converted into flooring-boards by once passing through the mill. The gangs consist of twelve to twenty-four saws, driven by direct connections with a steam engine at a speed of one hundred and twenty to one hundred and forty strokes per minute. They are not much known, except at the South, but we think they would be found highly useful in the pine forests of New Jersey, and the Middle and Western States. Recently this firm has been largely employed in building engines for government vessels - the gunboats Itasca, Scioto, and Tacony; the Ericsson batteries, San-gamon and Lehigh, and the Iron-clad batteries, Monadnock and Ag-amenticus. The firm of I. P. Morris, Towne & Co., is now composed of Isaac P. Morris, John H. Towne, John J. Thompson, and Lewis Taws. The first-named gentleman was born in 1803, was one of the original partners in the firm of Levi Morris & Co., who commenced business in 1828, and since that period has been identified with the manufacturing interests of Philadelphia. In his business career, he has been distinguished for a discriminating intelligence, inflexible honesty, and a laudable public spirit. Mr. J. H. Towne was formerly engineering partner of the firm of Merrick & Towne, and is an engineer of unquestioned ability. Mr. Thompson, who has- been connected with the establishment for many years, has under his charge the finances of the firm. Mr. Taws has been connected with the concern since 1834, and until 1861, when Mr. Towne joined the firm, had exclusive control of the mechanical department of the establishment. He served his apprenticeship with Rush & Muhlenberg, the successors of Oliver Evans, and in early manhood went to New York, where he entered into the employment of the West Point Foundry Association, then under the superintendence of Adam Hall, a distinguished Scotch engineer. The present arrangement of the Port Richmond Works is the result of his experience. The firm of I. P. Morris, Towne & Co. have a capital invested in their business of over $400.000, and employ about 400 hands. Their list of manufactures includes every description of heavy machinery except locomotives.
QUELLE[Bishop: History of American manufacturers 3 (1868) 24]


ZEIT1857
THEMABeschreibung
TEXTThese Works, which rank among the largest and best equipped of the kind in the entire Union, were founded in 1828, by Levi Morris & Co., at the corner of Market and Schuylkill Seventh streets. The first engine constructed was
a Vertical Lever-beam Engine, 10 inch cylinder, 2 feet stroke, built for John Barclay, Vine-street Wharf, Delaware, for a flour mill, and is still in existence at Wainwright's saw-mill, Kensington. At that time, there was not in the Works a single slide-lathe or power drill-press, and planing-machines were not known; the only representative
of this tool, it is believed, was to be found at the Allaire Works in New York, built for fluting rollers. The original of the present planing-machine was imported from England, and purchased by the West Point Foundry Association, for their Works in West street, New York. Patterns for a similar machine were made after this model, and several sets of eastings made. One of these, purchased for the Richmond Works, was fitted up here, and started about 1836. In the Foundry department the operations were also conducted with very imperfect and inefficient machinery compared with that now in use. Anthracite coal, which was introduced here about 1820, was by no means exclusively used for melting Iron. The Blowing Machinery was of a very primitive character; with unwieldy wooden bellows and open tuyeres. The best product was not more than 2,000 to 3,000 pounds of Iron in an hour, and in the course of the heat an average much below this. With the present improved Blowing Machinery, and improved furnaces, eight tons have been melted in forty-six minutes, with a consumption of coal of one pound to eight pounds of Iron melted.
The present location of these works, to which they were removed in 1846, is on the Delaware River, adjoining the Reading Rail-road Coal Wharves on the south. The buildings, which are of brick, occupy a lot having a front on the Delaware River of 145 feet, a front on Richmond street or Point Road, of 260 feet, and an entire depth or length, from the Richmond side to the end of wharf, of 1,050 feet. The remarkable feature in this establishment is the extraordinary size of the tools in use, and the perfection of the machines employed in the various shops. In the Foundry there are three Cupola Furnaces, the largest of which will melt twelve tons of Iron per hour; and a large-size Air Furnace of the best description. In the Machine Shop there is a Planing Machine capable of planing castings 8 feet wide, 6 feet high, and 32 feet long; a Lathe that will swing 6 feet clear, and turn a length of 34 feet; and a Boring Mill, possessing also the qualities of a horizontal lathe, which will bore out a cylinder 16 feet in diameter and 18 feet long. This is believed to be the largest in America or Europe. In their Boiler Shop they have one large Riveting Machine, and facilities for making boilers or plate-iron work, of every description that may be desired. But a few years ago, Steam Boilers, made of plate-iron, were riveted exclusively with hand-hammers; and when the City Water-works were located at Centre Square, the steam boilers were built of wood with cast-iron furnaces. At the present time, in this, as in the best shops, circular boilers are riveted in a machine, by pressure produced by a cam operating upon a sliding mandril. In their Smithery, they have a Nasmyth Steam Hammer, for heavy forgings; a Tilt Hammer, for light work; and throughout the establishment, the minor tools, consisting of Lathes, Boring Mills, Slotting and Shaping Machines, Planing Machines, Horizontal and Vertical Drills, &c., &c., are all of the best description, and combine the latest improvements.
Besides the superiority of its machinery, this establishment has been peculiarly fortunate in its mechanical engineers. This position is now filled by one of the partners, Mr. Lewis Taws, who has been connected with the establishment since 1834, and whose apprenticeship was passed with Rush & Muhlenburg, the two sons-in-law and successors of Oliver Evans, in his establishment, then located at the corner of Vine and Ninth streets. After his apprenticeship, he obtained employment at the West Point Foundry Association, in New York, where he added to his stock of information from the practice at those works, which at that time were under the able management of Adam Hall, a Scotch engineer of much eminence. By the proprietors he was sent to the West Indies, to erect sugar-mills, and remained during the grinding season; thus obtaining a practical knowledge of this branch of the business. Subsequently, lie was selected by the same Association to erect, in North Carolina, the celebrated Gang Saw-mills, consisting of twelve to twenty-four saws, driven by direct connection with a steam-engine, running at a speed of 120 to 140 strokes per minute. Since that time, the firm with which he is now connected have built a great number of similar machines, with such improvements as have been suggested by many years experience. Flooring boards of yellow pine may almost be deemed an indigenous production of North Carolina; and these mills, which are but little known except at the South, where such timber grows, are peculiarly adapted for their production. A log of yellow pine by this arrangement can be converted into flooring boards by once passing through the mill. With the practical experience obtained by first constructing and then working the machines, Mr. Taws was eminently fitted to enter upon the more enlarged field that opened to him in taking the management, as chief mechanical director, of an establishment for the construction of machinery of every description, and for every known purpose; and with what success he has filled the position, the large amount of steam-engines and machinery of every description, constructed under his supervision, and scattered broadcast throughout this country, Cuba, and Porto Rico, and rating wherever placed as second to none, is direct, ample, and satisfactory evidence. The firm of I. P. Morris & Co. is now composed of Isaac P. Morris, John J. Thompson, and Lewis Taws. Their list of manufactures embraces Land and Marine Steam Engines, of all sizes and descriptions; Blowing Machinery, Hoisting and Pumping Engines, Rolling Mill Work, Sugar Mills and Sugar Apparatus; in fact, all kinds of heavy machinery except Locomotives.
QUELLE[Freedley: Philadelphia and its manufactures (1857) 432]