Jesse W. Starr & Sons, Camden Iron Works

Allgemeines

FirmennameJesse W. Starr & Sons, Camden Iron Works
OrtssitzCamden (New Jersey)
Art des UnternehmensMaschinenfabrik und Kesselschmiede
AnmerkungenEigentümer: Jesse W. Starr & Sons. Büro in Philadelphia: 403 Walnut Street. Seit 1850 in Camden. Seit 1883: Teil von "R. D. Wood & Co.", Millville (s. unter der neuen Firma).
Quellenangaben[Wiley: American iron trade manual (1874) 54]




Unternehmensgeschichte

Zeit Ereignis
1824 Gründung
1883 "R. D. Wood & Co." kauft die Gießerei von J. W. Starr & Sons




Produkte

Produkt ab Bem. bis Bem. Kommentar
Gaswerke 1874 [Wiley: American iron trade (1874)] 1874 [Wiley: American iron trade (1874)] Vorgabe: Gas works
Gußeisen-Rohre 1874 [Wiley: American iron trade (1874)] 1883 Übernahme durch R. D. Wood & Co. Vorgabe: cast-iron pipe
Gußeisen-Rohre 1874 [Wiley: American iron trade (1874)] 1883 Übernahme durch R. D. Wood & Co. Vorgabe: cast-iron pipe
Haltevorrichtungen 1874 [Wiley: American iron trade (1874)] 1874 [Wiley: American iron trade (1874)] Vorgabe: holders
Kessel 1874 [Wiley: American iron trade (1874)] 1874 [Wiley: American iron trade (1874)] Vorgabe: boilers
Maschinerie 1874 [Wiley: American iron trade (1874)] 1883 Übernahme durch R. D. Wood & Co. Vorgabe: machinery. Unsicher, ob schon Dampfmaschinen-/pumpen-Bau (jedenfalls unter Wood & Co. der Fall)




Personal

Zeit gesamt Arbeiter Angest. Lehrl. Kommentar
1874 1300        




Firmen-Änderungen, Zusammenschüsse, Teilungen, Beteiligungen


Zeit = 1: Zeitpunkt unbekannt

Zeit Bezug Abfolge andere Firma Kommentar
1883 Umbenennung danach R. D. Wood & Co., Camden Iron Works Von Starr and Wood verkauft




Allgemeines

ZEIT1874
THEMAAngaben zum Unternehmen
TEXTThis works was engaged in wrought-iron work, and in Camden in 1850. The establishment covers an area of seven acres, and is located in South Camden, on Cooper Creek, which affords wharfage for a length of 1,800 feet, and water connection with the Delaware River, a track from the Amboy Division of the Pennsylvania Railroad furnishing rail communication in all directions. The foundries occupy eight buildings, of which the largest are 190 by 60 feet, and 24 feet high. In the pipe works the capacity, when running full, is near 150 tons per day. Additional works are being constructed of stone, to be finished in the spring of 1874, and will be used for machine and pattern shops. This building is 279 feet long by 66 feet wide, and two stories high, with a wing, 67 by 66 feet, of one story, designed for core ovens, etc., and which will be extended 180 feet, as a loam shop for castings. The whole works is gradually being rebuilt, and when completed is intended to be the most extensive works of its kind in the world. The Messrs. Starr & Sons have another foundry in Camden proper, consuming some forty tons of iron daily. The firm has furnished gas holders and machinery for many cities in all sections of the country, and shipped water-mains and heavy pipe throughout the country. A train of cars loaded with heavy pipe left these works in 1873 for San Francisco, where the freight was delivered without breaking bulk.
QUELLE[Wigley: Iron industry (1874)]